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copper rose by knivesandroses copper rose by knivesandroses
Forged and formed copper rose made from bar and sheet copper. The color is a patina obtained by heating in the forge fire and then quenching at the proper time. The temperature and atmosphere within the forge has to be controlled carefully. The colors are stable though and last.
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Daily Deviation

Given 2009-08-26
copper rose by ~knivesandroses. The suggester wrote, "I was speechless when I saw this, the intricate detail and effort put into this is just amazing. If you like this, be sure to check out the rest of this deviant's gallery. He truly has a gift for metal work." ( Suggested by nonnihil and Featured by Kitten-of-Woe )
:iconthewildtornado:
TheWildTornado Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2015  Student General Artist
Magical :)
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:iconsilencer1357:
SILENCER1357 Featured By Owner May 10, 2014  Student
The detail in this rose is awesome, I really like it!!
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:icongrapeshotmemory:
grapeshotmemory Featured By Owner May 10, 2014
This is lovely. It reminds me of something in a book I read once, a magical tree of iron that bloomed copper roses.
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:icondazzlindave:
DazzlinDave Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
Great work!! The detail is really good.

I made one from steel if you want to have a look...
[link]
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:iconbloodshotink:
BloodshotInk Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2012
:rose: Hey there I featured this work here.
I hope you like it and it gets more attention
for this beautiful piece : ) Thanks! :heart:
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:iconmartina606:
martina606 Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Incredible!
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2011
I am still amazed at the reception the copper rose gets.
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:icondazzlindave:
DazzlinDave Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
Mine gets a lot of attention, though it's not my normal work. I did one on a whim and had many requests for more. I'm still thinking of how to patina the steel for color. So far I've only made two.
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:iconbluebow12:
bluebow12 Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2011   Photographer
wow so good
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2011
Thanks..... I just sold that one and now I get to make another.
While I like the enameled roses better, most of the responses have been on the copper rose which shows a heat coloring. That particular rose will not heat color to a red. Instead, it goes to a tarnished color. At first, I rejected the color as bad. But, when I began to get so much positive feedback, I changed my perception of it in response. One thing I have learned over the years is that My own viewpoint is not the only valid viewpoint. Well, thanks again. Hope to hear from you another time. Smitty
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:icontechnetium09:
Technetium09 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2011
Wow! That makes my aluminum roses look like crap.
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Mar 12, 2011
Hey to you....aluminum is likely stiffer than the thin (.010) copper foil I use. And I anneal it several times or as needed in the process. I also have made them for at least 10 years. The first ones were pretty different. Stay away from copper sheet from the junkyard that is magnetic. Likely is not really copper but something alloyed with something magnetic. I do use it but it is stiff, very stiff and much harder to form than real copper. I suspect it is roofing flashing copper. Before you buy a bunch, try out a smaller piece. If you can use it, well then so much the better. You are surely going to have to anneal whatever you get. That roofing flashing is stiff even when annealed, though somewhat less than before annealing. I use my fingers, and pliers both ordinary and needle nose as well as various diameters of wooden dowels to push and wrap around. Small hammers may at times be useful in combination with the dowel which is held on the backside of the petal.
When I started I went to a craft section in whatever store was around, and bought a fabric rose, took it apart to study how they had constructed it and get as a starting point for the pieces. Stay in touch as might like and I will answer your mails. John S
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:iconelmirinda:
Elmirinda Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2010
Did you use a torch to roll the edges of the petals back, or would that heat the metal too quickly?
I am very interested in smithing and am currently reading The Art of Blacksmithing so that I can understand the process a bit more before starting. This is the sort of work I hope to one day be able to do. Thank you for posting this, it is something to work towards.
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2010
Good Morning,
No. I annealed the material, then used fingers and pliers, etc. to form the petals. By the way, is The Art of Blacksmithing by Alex Bealer? If it is, don't take it too seriously.... There are other books way better. Depending on where you are located, possibly the best sources are your state blacksmithing organizations. When I started, I had only books...book, Bealer's book in fact. Not the most helpful beginning. Also the first rose I made was from steel. One of the reasons I became interested in blacksmithing is that I watched a young blacksmith forge a rose from a solid block of mild steel. If there are classes and workshops you can take at a college or through the blacksmith group, do it. You will learn more in a weekend than trying to get it from any book over months and months...... stay in touch, Smitty
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:iconelmirinda:
Elmirinda Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2010
Morning,
First off I want to thank you for the depth of your reply. Would you happen to have another titles for reference books? It is Alex Bealer's book that I have, I can see your point about it not being the greatest book for beginers, in particular those with little history in working with metals such as myself. I haven't found any blacksmithing courses or workshops out here but there are welding courses. Would it be wise to take welding courses while looking for a smithing course? Just to get a feel for working with metals. Stay safe and warm this winter, Shel
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2010
Happy Holidays.... I am having a total eclipse of the brain. It has been a long time since I have thought of good sources in print. A welding course is not a bad thing. learning to weld ordinary steel in an ordinary manner is very useful in the shop and definitely is an aid in design and construction. If you look for craft schools like Haystack and John C. Campbell you will find all kinds of classes. Your state blacksmithing group will be way cheaper. Look up ABANA. That is the Artist Blacksmith Assoc. of North America. They may list state chapters. Stay in touch with me. I will bang my head a couple more times and the title of a good sourcebook will pop out..... John
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:iconelmirinda:
Elmirinda Featured By Owner Jan 6, 2011
Happy New years, sorry about the late relpy, exam time. My grandpa is a welder, he has agreed to teach me the basics when spring rolls around. Thanks for trying to think of refference works, I am the type of person who needs step by step instructions within arms reach when I'm learning something. I found my provincal ABANA chapter as well, and possibly a knife smith who may be willing to help me out. Hope you had a wonderful New years, Shel
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2011
Shel,
Good way to go. Grandpa will give you a good introduction to working steel. Most of us learn much faster by having a hands-on experience. I hope you have fun and learn a lot ! John
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:iconjujusjewelry:
jujusjewelry Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2010
I want to comment... but I'm speechless. Wow.
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2010
Thank you for writing. That particular rose has really gotten a lot of attention. Smitty
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:iconlieralolita:
Lieralolita Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2010  Student Artisan Crafter
oh my...this is probably the most beautiful thing ive ever seen...
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2010
Thank you very much for the comment. When I made the piece, I had no idea how it would strike people's imagination. Really been a humbling experience. Smitty
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:iconlieralolita:
Lieralolita Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2010  Student Artisan Crafter
no problem!its a beautiful peice of art!
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:iconko2009:
ko2009 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2010
i'm n'joy metal art _/|\_
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:iconitsthemuffingirl:
itsthemuffingirl Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2010
Amazing!! always wanted one of these! :) Good work!!!
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2010
Hey Muffingirl... glad the rose brightened your day. Smitty
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:iconitsthemuffingirl:
itsthemuffingirl Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2010
:giggle: it did!!
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:iconmaylar:
Maylar Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2009  Professional General Artist
Ahh, this one is special beauty...I have seen many metal flowers and quite many roses among those, but rarely this good and realistic...
Only, with me it's not so much about realistic look, but to that fragile, gentle impression it gives...I can almost imagine bushes of these, growing in some other, distant world of metal flowers...beautiful is the right word.
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2009
Thank you so much for the thoughtful response. The delicate nature of a living rose can hardly be separated from its fragile look. The two go together, as you say. And they give the metal truly a lifelike appearance.

This may not say much about grown men... but I have watched as one man who had never seen any of my work, after holding the rose by its stem for a few minutes, brought the rose up to his nose and sniffed...as if to discover a scent. As quickly as he could he lowered the rose and looked around to see who might have caught sight of him in the dim light of the tavern. I saw him. So, the next day, I went out and bought a vial of rose oil, and since then have put a few drops into the center of every rose. just a little wonderful discovery. Thanks again, John
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:iconmaylar:
Maylar Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2009  Professional General Artist
A great story! And you know, I'm not sure if I wouldn't do the same as that man, only I wouldn't be ashamed of it...it's so lifelike, it just calls for a sniff. Great idea about scent, I'm sure people who discover it are pleasantly surprised :)
But can you answer me a question: would be possible to make a rose out of silver? Just wondering and if you ever read "Amber Chronicles" you'll easily guess why :)
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2009
No, don't know "Amber Chronicles". The roses are very lifelike. Many who have held them, even though they are heavy, have asked if I had started with a live rose and dipped it in something. I was asked to do a rose in silver once. I looked into it but declined. Paul Revere was a silversmith by trade. But, I am self-taught and that has some limitations. I think fine silver may be able to be used. Sterling, I think, will not be suitable. If you try it yourself, let me know what you find. The petals are built in courses, not individually. They are not easy to form at any rate. The compound curves of each petal fight the closing up of that course of petals. Enjoyed your reply. Looking forward to hearing from you again. Smitty
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:iconmaylar:
Maylar Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2009  Professional General Artist
It would be pure pleasure to try, but I lack both metal and craftsmanship for such task...well, maybe one day.
Until then, I am pretty satisfied with looking at this one and all your other metal works, they are beautiful to me and rarely for metal, have a soul...
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2009
I don't know how it is that some metal, as you say, shows "soul", and other pieces show workmanship, manipulation, creativity, color...but are lacking "soul". It is an ephemeral quality that stubbornly defies straightforward manipulation. When I first began to work that bunch of copper sheet, I found that because of its alloy I could not get it to color the way I wanted. So, I let the stuff lay for a good year, thinking I would have to resell it. But, one day, I decided to do a complete rose with it, and there it was, way different from the red ones, but maybe better for it. Thanks again, and I do look forward to visiting with you. Smitty
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:iconwillowdancer:
willowdancer Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2009
wow, this is very lovely. What struck me most was how realistic it looked: like you had somehow plucked a rose from a garden of copper plants.
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2009
Dear Willow,
When I first began to make a copper rose, it was very stylized, not realistic at all. It has taken me a good 7, maybe 8 years to get them to the presentation they offer now. I always have held out the thought that somehow they would begin to sell. Well, they do. But, very slowly. What I have come to, is that I make them as I do with no thought as to whether they will sell. The making of them has become the main thing. And, while I would always like to sell one,that they appear as they do is enough for me just as the appearance of a beautiful rose in a garden is enough for whom it blooms. Smitty
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:icontopaz-wolf:
topaz-wolf Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2009
very good
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2009
Thank you Topaz...
Really appreciate that you took the time to write. Thanks, Smitty
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:iconatruenorseman:
ATrueNorseman Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009  Hobbyist Writer
that is sweeet!
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:iconnebetseta:
NebetSeta Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009  Student General Artist
That's absolutely gorgeous! :heart: How did you come to work with metal, and how do you do it now? I mean, it seems to work with metal requires a lot of money for all the supplies and equipment to make anything. :thumbsup: Great craftsmanship!
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2009
I began in 1979 with borrowed anvil, borrowed hammer, an old forge and Illinois coal (poor quality). I found a book(badly written) and started in. Did everything wrong and the hardest way, nothing...absolutely nothing but failures. I took myself to every workshop and seminar that I could afford and just kept it up, and visited every shop I could get an invitation to, made friends who helped me along the way and simply would not quit. Yes, to go out and buy all new equip would be more than most of us could handle, myself included. I remade,and re-purposed all manner of things, and still do. Generally, others are happy to help someone who wants to get started. But, do what you can do. With two pairs of cheap needle nose pliers,a roll of soft, small gauge tie wire(easy to bend) from a hardware store or a farm store, and a pair of gloves, some very nice sculptural work can be accomplished. The biggest challenge to getting started is not equipment it is an inability or unwillingness to work with what is front of us. When I started to make knives, I could not justify spending money on new steel. But, I found that the local junkyard guy would allow me to scrounge around for metal that I could manage by reforging. Some was good for knives...and some didn't work out. I learned a bunch even from the failures. Just start in at whatever level is doable, and go in the direction that you can manage. Keep yourself from worrying about what it is that you can not do, and focus on what is at hand that can be done. YOu have drawing skills. That is more than I had when I started. Only learned to draw 4 years ago. But, if you are attracted to metal, just keep going. No doubt you will surprise yourself with the success that is there for you. Smitty
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:iconnebetseta:
NebetSeta Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2010  Student General Artist
First, happy holidays!!! :XD: A year and some months late! ;P
Thank you for your thoughtful and thorough reply! It's amazing what people can do - and the patience and skill to do it!
Hopefully I'll reach that patience persistence and skill level - I know a lot of it is practice, practice, practice, patience, and practice! ;)
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Dec 16, 2010
Well Happy Holidays to you. A lot of us work making one thing or another from a deep-seated drive to create, or at least to make things that reflect some aspect of our life experience. What we make over the years changes, but the need to do it remains. Merry Christmas....John
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:iconnebetseta:
NebetSeta Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2010  Student General Artist
I understand you completely. Same here. :) And thank you for the wishes! :heart:
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:iconpookadook:
Pookadook Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
*jaw drops*
i'm at a loss for words... this is sooo beautiful
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2009
Glad you think the work is good. I saw your site. You have good drawing skills. What an advantage. Roses have caught my eye for years. I worked about 6 years off and on to get them where I want them. Good bike trails up in MN.
I have ridden some of the Rail-Trails there. They are great. Watched a bear cross the path in front of us a couple years ago. He definitely had the green light. We had the red.
We are thinking that we may head back up this Fall to the Eastern side near the Mississippi River for a week of riding. We don't go fast. We just keep going. Smitty
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:icondjrimzi:
djRimzi Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009
Exquisite... bravo. :+favlove:
::: speechless :::

Congratulations on your DD, it is well deserved. :clap:
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2009
Thanks again...again as I have sent you an EMail just a few minutes ago. I really like your work as shown on your site. Smitty
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:icon13devilgirl13:
13devilgirl13 Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I love the color and the rose looks like it itself has been in a fire and "set in stone" sorta. Which I think is cool.
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:iconknivesandroses:
knivesandroses Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2009
Hey #13,
The story behind the color begins as a huge mistake... so I thought. At the height of the outrageous pricing of copper some time back, I bought 40 lbs. When I got my stuff home, I tried it out and to my dismay could not get the stuff to give a reddish heat patina. I was so P.O.'d Bad bad bad! No can do I thought. Unusable. Well, I finally finished a rose and despite how ugly I thought it was, others thought differently. It has taken quite a time for me to come round to other's thinking, but I have. Moral of the story, the artist may not be the best judge of the work. I have come to appreciate the conflict inherent in the colors present and value that conflict for the interest it creates. I still like the colorful glass ones. But, that is just me. I visited your site and see that you are a,shall we say, High-energy girl... Hope to visit with another time. Smitty
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:icon13devilgirl13:
13devilgirl13 Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
:forgiveme:for the late reply, but that is awesome majorly cool :), I've always wondered if copper could be used for art, and Ha I've been proven correct it can and is very very cool :). and Cheaaa on a good day I'm a High-energy gal :) other day's I'm mello and chill :)
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Submitted on
July 30, 2009
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OLYMPUS OPTICAL CO.,LTD
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